Ruby

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Ruby on Rails Development Setup for Beginners

Today we will install Ruby on Rails (RoR) on a Debian Linux operating system (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS). With that said, RoR is compatible with other operating systems with just a few tweaks. This blog will assist you in installing RoR with a simple step-by-step process. Your installation may differ, for other operating systems refer to this site. I am new to developing and have been using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, a flavor of Debian Linux, for my projects.

appsignal

The Easiest Way to Monitor Ruby: Automatic Instrumentation

Setting up a proper monitoring overview over your application’s performance is a complex task. Normally, you’d first need to figure out what you need to monitor, then instrument your code, and finally make sense of all the data that has been emitted. However, with a few things set in place, and an APM that natively supports Ruby, it’s easier than ever to take this step. In this post, we’ll show you how you can do it too.

honeybadger

Logging in Ruby with Logger and Lograge

Logging is tricky. You want logs to include enough detail to be useful, but not so much that you're drowning in noise - or violating regulations like GDPR. In this article, Diogo Souza introduces us to Ruby's logging system and the LogRage gem. He shows us how to create custom logs, output the logs in formats like JSON, and reduce the verbosity of default Rails logs.

appsignal

Announcing AppSignal for Ruby Gem 3.0!

We’re very happy to present you with version 3.0 of AppSignal for Ruby - a new major release for the Ruby gem. 🎉 We have changed the way we instrument apps and gems to provide better compatibility with other instrumentation gems. Support for Ruby version 1.9 has been removed and deprecated classes, modules, methods, and instrumentations have also been removed. Read our upgrade guide! In the rest of the post, we’ll explain what the new version of our gem brings to you and your apps.

elastic

Ruby and Python clients for Elastic Enterprise Search now generally available

Back in our 7.10 release of the Elastic Stack, we announced the beta of our Ruby and Python clients for Elastic Enterprise Search. Now, with 7.11, both the Ruby and Python clients are generally available. We’ve also begun work on a PHP client. All client source code for both enterprise-search-ruby and enterprise-search-python is available on GitHub. Documentation on how to get started with each client is available on elastic.co.

sqreen

Preventing SQL injections in Ruby (and other vulnerabilities)

This post’s topic is very straightforward: SQL injection, Ruby flavored. More specifically, how you can protect your Ruby application against SQL injections—and other common security threats. Ruby is a wonderful language for beginner coders to start with and scale to large, distributed Web and Desktop applications. It has an accepting and helpful community. Also, it strives to keep itself up to date to match the needs of developers.

sqreen

Top 10 Ruby security best practices

Do you know those things that are simultaneously incredibly important to get right but incredibly easy to get wrong? That makes for an explosive combination. One such thing happens to be one of the hardest areas in software development: security. Security is hard no matter the language or platform. Today, we’re here to talk specifically about security best practices in Ruby.