Sentry

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Instrumenting Our Frontend Test Suite (...and fixing what we found)

Here at Sentry, we like to dogfood our product as much as possible. Sometimes, it results in unusual applications of our product and sometimes these unusual applications pay off in a meaningful way. In this blog post, we’ll examine one such case where we use the Sentry JavaScript SDK to instrument Jest (which runs our frontend test suite) and how we addressed the issues that we found.

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Root out the odd operation with Operations Breakdown

Transactions are sent when your service receives a request and sends a response, like an API call or a page load. Within each transaction is a series of operations. We built Operations Breakdown to help you, the developer, quickly see how much time was spent in each operation within a transaction. Why? Simple, so you can address the operations with the longest duration and likely causing annoying performance issues for your customer.

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Why Debugging JavaScript Sucks - And What You Can Do About It

What makes JavaScript great is also what makes it frustrating to debug. Its asynchronous nature makes it easy to manipulate the DOM in response to user events, but it also makes it difficult to locate problems. And JavaScript’s ubiquity has resulted in a variety of runtimes (e.g. Chromium’s V8, Safari’s JavaScriptCore, and Firefox’s SpiderMonkey) but having so many platforms can cause dizzying idiosyncracies — all of which need to be supported equally.

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Jamstack, Next.js, Netlify, and Sentry: How The Pieces Fit

Jamstack (Javascript + APIs + Markup) is a web architecture that combines the convenience of pre-built websites with the capacity to handle custom APIs and serverless functions. By separating the frontend UI from backend databases, Jamstack allows developers to structure their application in ways that deliver dynamic content faster.

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Find the Root Cause Faster with Trace View and Trace Navigator

Like a bratty teenager, traditional monitoring answers your questions, but does so in a terse, unhelpful manner: Why is my page slow? Guess it’s the API call. It’s a 504 thing — you wouldn’t understand. Ok, so why is the API call slow? Ask your DB query. Gosh! You need a better conversation with your code — one which gives you contextual clues about your application’s performance.