Memfault

San Francisco, CA, USA
2018
  |  By Martin Lampacher
In the previous articles, we used freestanding applications and relied on a global Zephyr installation. In this article, we’ll see how we can use West to resolve global dependencies by using workspace applications. We first explore West without even including Zephyr and then recreate the modified Blinky application from the previous article in a West workspace.
  |  By Thomas Sarlandie
April marked the return of the Embedded Open-Source Summit, this year in Seattle. I was lucky enough to be able to attend and split my time between the Memfault booth in the exposition hall and many of the captivating presentations. Since the videos have just been published on the the Linux Foundation’s YouTube account, we thought it would be a good time to highlight some of the talks and give you a quick summary which will, hopefully, inspire you to go watch them!
  |  By François Baldassari
Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of traveling to Nuremberg, Germany to attend Embedded World. If you have not heard about it before, Embedded World1 is the largest trade show in the embedded systems industry. This year, over 35,000 people attended and 1,100 businesses exhibited at the Nuremberg Messe.
  |  By Martin Lampacher
In the previous articles, we covered Devicetree in great detail: We’ve seen how we can create our own nodes, we’ve seen the supported property types, we know what bindings are, and we’ve seen how to access the Devicetree using Zephyr’s devicetree.h API. In this fifth article of the Practical Zephyr series, we’ll look at how Devicetree is used in practice by dissecting the Blinky application.
  |  By Aliaksandr Kavalchuk
In the previous article of this series, we briefly touched on how.bsd files written in Boundary Scan Description Language (BSDL) describe the structure of the boundary scan chain and the instruction set. In this article, we will examine this language’s syntax more closely before seeing how.bsd files are leveraged in JTAG testing in the next article.
  |  By Aliaksandr Kavalchuk
In the third installment of this JTAG deep dive series, we will talk in-depth about JTAG Boundary-Scan, a method used to test interconnects on PCBs and internal IC sub-blocks. It is defined in the IEEE 1149.1 standard. I recommend reading Part 1 & Part 2 of the series to get a good background on debugging with JTAG before jumping into this one!
  |  By Eric Johnson
Have you ever wondered if ELF is portable between 32-bit and 64-bit targets? Probably not, but this might be a common scenario for you if you work on 32-bit embedded devices but use a 64-bit host. Or maybe you’ve developed tooling for 32-bit MCUs and are transitioning to working on 64-bit targets. The ELF object file format is one of the most commonly used today. Most build systems provide an output to this format, and ELF is commonly used to output coredumps.
  |  By Aliaksandr Kavalchuk
As noted in my previous article Diving into JTAG protocol. Part 1 — Overview, JTAG was initially developed for testing integrated circuits and printed circuit boards. However, its potential for debugging was realized over time, and now JTAG has become the standard protocol for microcontroller debugging. Many Firmware and Embedded engineers first encountered it in this particular context.
  |  By Eric Johnson
With the number of wireless SoCs on the market, “Just add connectivity” is finally a reality! “Just” does a lot of lifting in that phrase. Connectivity, whether wired or wireless, adds numerous layers of complexity to your device. Treating your connectivity as a black box early in development is easy, but this strategy will implode when thousands of devices enter the field - trust me, I know. It’s not enough to test from end to end a few times in the office.
  |  By Martin Lampacher
Having covered the Devicetree basics in the previous article, we now add semantics to our Devicetree using so-called bindings: For each supported type, we’ll create a corresponding binding and look at the generated output to understand how it can be used with Zephyr’s Devicetree API. Notice that we’ll only look at Zephyr’s basic Devicetree API and won’t analyze specific subsystems such as gpio in detail.
  |  By Memfault
Watch the highlights from an engaging panel discussion with IoT experts from Toast, Samsara, Nordic Semiconductor, T-Mobile, Ovyl, and Memfault. The group discussed new research on the state of IoT software and shared practical advice on how to overcome common challenges.
  |  By Memfault
Join an all-star panel of IoT experts for an exciting discussion on key findings from new research on IoT software development. Hear from engineering leads at well-known brands, technology and integrator partners, and IoT stakeholders.
  |  By Memfault
From edge AI to the Cyber Resilience Act, hear about the hottest topics on everyone's lips at Embedded World 2024. Memfault co-founders François Baldassari and Chris Coleman discuss their take on this year's big themes. Learn what surprised them most and what the implications are for the industry's future.
  |  By Memfault
In this demo we show an example of how Memfault's Observability solution can work seamlessly with Blecon's Bluetooth technology to get devices connected and sending data to the cloud with ease. In this case the device is running a Nordic nRF52.
  |  By Memfault
In this launch week special we are talking about our newly released Jira Integration.
  |  By Memfault
In this launch week special we dive into a whole set of new features we have released designed to make it easier to get insights from the data you are collecting in Memfault and streamline the process of going from top level insight to device level investigation.
  |  By Memfault
This launch week special includes an overview of our newly release Device Vitals feature set. Device Vitals gives teams the ability to measure firmware stability, battery life, and connectivity performance for any embedded device, right out of the box.
  |  By Memfault
In this video Memfault Field CTO Thomas will walk you through each step to get your MCU based device integrated on Memfault and reporting crash data and our newly released, Device Vitals into Memfault. This walk through is using an ESP32 based device but the same principles can be applied to any MCU and we have lots of guidance available for different chipsets in our technical documentation.
  |  By Memfault
François Baldassari reveals our biggest product release yet. This pivotal launch marks a new era in IoT device performance monitoring, ensuring unparalleled insights into software stability, battery health, and connectivity— the three critical aspects of device vitality. Our latest breakthrough allows for the precise evaluation of your devices' quality, enabling swift identification and resolution of any issues. With François leading the charge, explore how our newest innovation empowers you to.
  |  By Memfault
Memfault would like to introduce you to Device Vitals. To ensure that your product maintains its quality even after it is launched, it is crucial to monitor three key indicators for your devices in the field: stability, connectivity, and battery life. By collecting Device Vitals, you can have access to valuable data that helps you understand the overall health of your fleet and the quality of your product.

Reduce risk, ship products faster, and resolve issues proactively by upgrading your Android and MCU-based devices with Memfault. By integrating Memfault into smart device infrastructure, developers and IoT device manufacturers can monitor and manage the entire device lifecycle, from development to feature updates, with ease and speed.

With Memfault, engineers no longer have to rely on incomplete user crash reports and their local debugger to reproduce and fix device issues in the field. Memfault's cloud-based firmware delivery, monitoring, and analytics tools dramatically reduce engineering and support overhead, enabling you to ship and manage thousands to millions of IoT devices with confidence./p>

One platform for more efficient device operations:

  • Continuously monitor devices: Go beyond application monitoring with device and fleet-level metrics, like battery health and connectivity with crash analytics for firmware.
  • Remotely debug firmware issues: Resolve issues more efficiently with automatic detection, alerts, deduplication, and actionable insights sent via the cloud.
  • Systematically deploy OTA updates: Keep customers happy by fixing bugs quickly and shipping features more frequently with staged rollouts and specific device groups (cohorts).

Cloud Debugging and Observability for Your IoT Devices.