Incident.io

London, UK
2021
  |  By incident.io
Clean, clear, and ready to be customized to suit your needs. Google Docs Having a dedicated incident post-mortem is just as important as having a robust incident response plan. The post-mortem is key to understanding exactly what went wrong, why it happened in the first place, and what you can do to avoid it in the future.
  |  By Chris Evans
Remind yourself of the worst incident your organization has faced. If you’re lucky it might have been your entire service being offline for a period of time. Less lucky, and perhaps you encountered something affecting the sensitive data your organization is the custodian of. Whilst uncommon, incidents of this severity happen to every organization at some point. This criticality of situation is what many refer to as a Sev0, the most severe of incidents.
  |  By incident.io
When an incident strikes, it often brings a whirlwind of stress for everyone involved—from the teams directly handling the issue to the stakeholders making crucial decisions. Imagine support teams on high alert, customers anxiously awaiting resolutions, and executives probing for answers to steer the company through turbulent times. This mounting pressure can make a challenging situation nearly unmanageable, especially when faced with problems that are new or unexpected.
  |  By Ed Dean
We went live with our first set of AI-enabled features a few months ago. Needless to say, we learned a lot along the way, as this was the first time we had experimented with generative AI. Here, I'll share some of what we've learned as we’ve grappled with using LLMs to power new products at incident.io. This will be most applicable to the application layer, AI-enabled but not AI companies.
  |  By incident.io
There’s no two ways about it: on-call is stressful. But with humans at the center, it’s especially important to find ways to make it as manageable and empathetic as possible. In this webinar with our friends at ELC, incident.io VP of Engineering, Noberto Lopes, and Intercom Staff Product Engineer, Andrej Blagojević, discuss their own experiences with on-call, and how the process can be better.
  |  By incident.io
The launch of On-call was an integral part of the incident.io mission to become the single place you turn when things go wrong, and recently we hosted a live virtual event to show how it all came together. In this event, incident.io Co-founder and CTO Pete Hamilton sat down with incident.io Product Manager Megan McDonald, Product Engineer Rory Bain, and fellow Co-founder and CPO Chris Evans to demo the product, discuss the journey of the creation, and expand on what’s next.
  |  By Luis Gonzalez
At incident.io, “We care about our customers” isn’t just a talking point. It’s a core part of how we operate. Whether it’s a big feature request or a small bug fix, we’ve been intentional about making sure that customers always feel heard and seen—no matter the ask. But it’s not just that.
  |  By Norberto Lopes
In the fast-paced world of software development and product delivery, incidents are often viewed as unwanted disruptions. Traditionally, incident management might only trigger for critical issues, like complete system outages, data loss of some kind, or security-related ones - you don’t need to go back that far for a few that were very serious: Heartbleed, xz utils, and more.
  |  By incident.io
We’re ecstatic to announce that we’ve been ranked #1 in G2’s Relationship Index for Spring 2024. G2's Relationship Index is a measure of several factors, including: This award means a lot to us as it’s a direct result of the partnerships we’ve built with customers—and it’s a recognition we’re very proud of. From the beginning, we’ve been laser-focused on being the single place you turn to when things go wrong.
  |  By Chris Evans
Here at incident.io, we're always pushing the boundaries of incident management and seeking new ways to enhance your on-call experience. That's why we're excited to announce our latest feature that's set to level-up the way you respond to incidents.
  |  By Incident.io
During a recent episode of ⁠The Debrief⁠, we spoke with Jeff Forde, Architect on the Platform Engineering team at Collectors, about building an incident management program at various stages of growth. In that episode, we called it growth from zero to one, one to two, and two to three. But what happens once you’ve scaled beyond three and answers to question you may have become that much harder to find.
  |  By Incident.io
In this event uncover the common pains associated with legacy incident management norms and why they don’t meet the mark for modern needs.
  |  By Incident.io
This week, we have a really fun conversation lined up. For this episode, we chatted with Toby Jackson, Global SRE Team Lead at Future, about why it’s a bad idea to take a cookie-cutter approach to incident management or, put another way, why it’s not a good idea to treat all incidents alike. In our conversation, we discuss what’s wrong with this approach, some situations where this might actually make sense, how psychological safety factors into this conversation, and a whole lot more.
  |  By Incident.io
In this clip, Pete explains why we've taken the approach of "exoskeletons, not robots" when building with AI. It’s fair to say that AI is here to stay. So, as companies grapple with this reality, they’re putting their best foot forward to build AI features that really make a difference for their customers. But should you be building these features if there’s no obvious fit in your product? And even if there is, are you making sure to stay true to your product principles?
  |  By Incident.io
It’s fair to say that AI is here to stay. So, as companies grapple with this reality, they’re putting their best foot forward to build AI features that really make a difference for their customers. But should you be building these features if there’s no obvious fit in your product? And even if there is, are you making sure to stay true to your product principles? The reality is that deciding to build AI into your product isn’t a decision you make on a whim.
  |  By Incident.io
It’s no secret that teamwork is one of those things that, when done right, can make a world of a difference. So sometimes, when responding to a particularly complicated incident, it can be best to bring a team together to figure out what’s going on and work towards a fix. But it’s not enough to just jam a bunch of folks into a room and hope for the best. You need a framework in place to ensure that everyone stays focused, diagnoses the issue and resolves it as quickly as possible.
  |  By Incident.io
In this clip, Viktor Stanchev explains why it's better to declare incidents early rather than too late. Whether you’re a seasoned vet when it comes to incident response, or just getting started out, it can be easy to fall into the trap of doing too much all at once. And it just makes sense. Incident response is one of those things that doesn’t have a single, perfect formula, so teams can be left doing a little bit of everything in an effort to get it right.
  |  By Incident.io
In this clip, Dan Slimmons explains what this clinical troubleshooting framework entails. It’s no secret that teamwork is one of those things that, when done right, can make a world of a difference. So sometimes, when responding to a particularly complicated incident, it can be best to bring a team together to figure out what’s going on and work towards a fix. But it’s not enough to just jam a bunch of folks into a room and hope for the best. You need a framework in place to ensure that everyone stays focused, diagnoses the issue and resolves it as quickly as possible.
  |  By Incident.io
In this clip, Viktor Stanchev explains why it's important to remember that learning is an iterative process. Whether you’re a seasoned vet when it comes to incident response, or just getting started out, it can be easy to fall into the trap of doing too much all at once. And it just makes sense. Incident response is one of those things that doesn’t have a single, perfect formula, so teams can be left doing a little bit of everything in an effort to get it right.
  |  By Incident.io
In this clip, Dennis Henry of Okta explains why having more low-severity incidents can be a good thing. In last week’s episode of The Debrief, we had on Colette Alexander, Director of Engineering at HashiCorp, to discuss some of the myths around incident response. In that conversation, one of the myths we spoke about was the idea that asking “why” is better than asking “how.” And how, in reality, asking "how" allows you to focus more on the contributing factors that led to an incident happening, whereas “why” tends to single out a person, which can lead to a lot of blame.

Create, manage and resolve incidents directly in Slack. Leave the admin and reporting to us.

Improving your incident response, visibility, and ability to learn:

  • Less faffing, more fixing: We take care of the admin during incidents, so you can save your brainpower for the decisions that matter.
  • Divide and conquer: We make sure everyone’s role is clear, track who’s working on what, and help you escalate if you need extra help.
  • Get up to speed, at speed: Get everyone on the same page from the moment they join the incident, and help stakeholders stay in the loop.
  • Timelines, in no time: Constructing an incident timeline for review is important, but time consuming. We’ll build one for you in real-time, and keep it constantly up to date.
  • Data and insights you can trust: You’ve already paid for your incidents. By surfacing the data you need to make decisions, we help you get your money’s worth.

Incident response for your whole organisation.