Ghost Inspector

ghost inspector

Continuous Integration Testing for WordPress

While continuous integration is a common practice for most development teams, the stateful nature of WordPress makes it difficult, but not impossible, to setup. For our open source WordPress plugin, we wanted to integrate our standard build and test process for every pull request using CircleCI. While it might be easier to setup a permanent staging environment, we wanted every build to be isolated for dependable testing.

ghost inspector

Automated UI Testing for WordPress

Many websites and even applications online are built on top of a CMS. According to recent survey data, WordPress has a 60% market share, making it the most popular CMS by far. The next closest competitor, Joomla, has only 5.2%! But unlike bespoke software, many people don’t test their WordPress website. While the core of WordPress is fairly well tested by it’s creators, users, and the open source community, the same cannot be said for every plugin and theme.

ghost inspector

Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack and React

Ghost Inspector is an automated browser testing tool for continuously monitoring websites. We recently released our WordPress plugin to show test results inside your WordPress admin dashboard. In this tutorial, you will learn how to build your own plugin using React, Webpack, and the Ghost Inspector API. You can view the final source code on GitHub.

ghost inspector

Ghost Inspector's New WordPress Plugin

Ghost Inspector is an automated browser testing tool for continously monitoring websites. Many of those websites run on WordPress. After lots of demand from our users, we've built a plugin to show your Ghost Inspector test results right inside your WordPress admin panel. The plugin enables you to display the latest test results for a single suite on the dashboard of any self-hosted WordPress installation. Keep reading to learn how to install and setup the plugin.

Headless Browsers & Testing at Scale @ Austin Automation Professionals Meetup

Chrome and Firefox now fully support a “headless” mode to help facilitate and speed up end-to-end testing, with other browsers potentially following suit. But what are headless browsers, exactly? What are the benefits? And how can they help to scale our testing efforts?